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Creo Parametric

Replacing Surfaces and Trimming to Geometry

You can edit mold volumes by replacing surfaces and trimming them to other geometry. • Replacing surfaces can: – Add volume. – Remove volume. – Add and remove volume simultaneously. • Trimming to geometry trims a volume to a specified reference. – Specify the direction to be removed. Figure 2 – Mold Volume Before Surface Replace …

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Sketching Lifter Mold Volumes

A lifter is another mold component that helps account for undercuts of the inside of the reference model geometry. • Lifters usually move at an angle. • Lifters are usually long and narrow. Sketching Lifter Mold Volumes Figure 1 – Viewing the Undercut Figure 2 – Lifter Created to Account …

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Creating a Reference Part Cutout

A reference part cutout enables you to remove any overlapping reference model geometry from the mold volume. • The reference model volume is subtracted from the mold volume. • The resulting mold volume geometry matches the mating reference model geometry. • It helps you to verify that you have created the desired mold volume. • This is …

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Sketching Slider Mold Volumes

You can sketch slider mold volumes as an alternative to calculating undercut boundaries. • Reasons to sketch slider mold volumes: – Shape – Size – Result • Sketching guidelines: – Calculate undercut boundaries for reference. – Ensure your sketched slider accounts for the entire undercut geometry. – The sketch must be closed. Figure 2 – …

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Creating Sliders using Boundary Quilts

The system can calculate undercut areas in the reference model and create boundary quilts to be used for automatic slider creation. • A slider is a special type of mold volume. • Boundary quilts are created in undercut areas. • Slider mold volume is created from the boundary quilt. • Slider mold volume can be projected …

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Sketching Mold Volumes

You can create a mold volume by sketching its shape. • Sketch-based feature tools include: – Extrude – Revolve – Sweep – Blend – Swept Blend – Use Quilt Figure 2 – Mold Model with No  Mold Volumes Sketching Mold Volumes Figure 1 – Sketching a Mold Volume Figure 3 – …

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Understanding Mold Volumes

A mold volume consists of surfaces that locate a closed volume of space within the workpiece. • Mold volumes: – Have no solid material. – Are ultimately used to create solid mold components. – Are assembly-level features. • As a best practice you should rename mold volumes. • You can apply finishing features such …

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Surfacing Terms

Surface modeling terms are important to understand because they are used throughout this course. • Surfaces – Quilt – Surface Patch – Solid Surface – Datum Planes • Edges – Surface edge ♦ One-sided ♦ Two-sided – Solid edge Figure 3 – Solid Surface and Edge Surfacing Terms Figure 1 – Viewing …

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Reclassifying and Removing Mold Model Components

Reclassifying mold components is a great way to switch which component is used as the workpiece. • Each component type can be reclassified to any other type: – Workpiece – Mold Base Component – Mold Component • You cannot reclassify the reference model. Figure 2 – Mold Base Component Reclassified …

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Creating and Assembling a Workpiece Manually

You can create a part model inside or outside of Mold mode and designate it as the workpiece when assembling it into the mold model. • Use conventional part modeling techniques. • Assemble workpiece using conventional assembly constraints. • The accuracy of a manually created workpiece must be matched to the reference model. Figure 2 – Creating …

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