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Analyzing Surface Editing and Manipulation Tools

When working with surfaces, it is often necessary to edit and manipulate quilts to achieve your desired design intent.
• Tools include:
– Extend
– Trim
– Copy and Paste
– Offset
– Mirror
– Merge

Analyzing Surface Editing and Manipulation 2
Figure 2 – Trimming a Quilt

Analyzing Surface Editing and Manipulation 1
Figure 1 – Extending a Surface to Plane using Geometry

Analyzing Surface Editing and Manipulation Tools 3

Figure 3 – Mirroring a Quilt
Analyzing Surface Editing and Manipulation Tools
When working with surfaces, it is often necessary to edit and manipulate quilts to achieve your desired design intent. You can use the following tools to edit and manipulate surfaces.
Surface editing and manipulation tools are covered in greater detail in PTC’s surfacing courses.
Extending Surfaces
You can extend a quilt using either of the following methods:
• Extend Original Surface
— Extends the surface boundary edge chain along the original surface. This option has three additional options that determine how the extension is created:
– Same — Creates the extension of the same type as the original surface (for example, plane, cylinder, cone, or spline surface). The original
surface is extended past its selected boundary edge chain, and does not create an additional surface patch. This is the default extend option.
– Tangent — Creates the extension as a ruled surface that is tangent to the original surface. With this option an additional surface patch is created.
– Approximate — Creates the extension as a boundary blend between the boundary edges of the original surface and the edges of the extension.
This method is useful when extending the surface up to a vertex that does not lie along a straight edge. With this option an additional surface
patch is created.
• Extend Surface To Plane
— Extends the boundary edge chain up to a specified plane in the direction normal to this plane. With this option an
additional surface patch is created.
Trimming Surfaces
A surface trim is analogous to a solid cut, except that it trims away a portion of a surface. You can create a surface trim as an extrude, revolve, sweep, blend, and so on. You can also trim a selected surface quilt using other geometry such as planes, quilts, and curves or edges.
Once you have specified the surface to be trimmed and the entity to do the trimming, you must specify which side is to be kept. You can opt to keep one side, the other side, or both sides.
Copying and Pasting Surfaces
Copying and pasting surfaces enables you to create an overlay of a surface so that you can then perform manipulations to the copied surface. You can copy and paste any surface or surface set, either from a quilt or a solid. You can use either CTRL+C and CTRL+V or the Copy
and Paste icons from the Operations group in the ribbon. You should only use the Copy functionality in situations where you do not have proper references to create the parting surfaces. The copy functionality can result in a lot of surface features, especially when you are working with a complex design.
Offsetting Surfaces
You can create a surface quilt offset a distance value from another quilt or a solid surface. The offset surface remains dependent on the original surface.
When offsetting surfaces, you can specify the fit type as either Normal to Surface, Automatic Fit, or Controlled Fit.
Mirroring Surfaces
You can transform a surface quilt by mirroring it. To mirror a quilt, select the quilt and click Mirror
surface feature is created.
Merging Surfaces
, specifying a reference plane for the mirror. A new You can merge two or more intersecting or adjacent quilts to create surfaces
with 2-sided edges. Merging surfaces is covered more in depth in other topics.

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